NeuStem™

$50.00$60.00

The New NeuStem™ Cell Helper Product is a 750 mg. 2 per day capsule that is more concentrated in Phycocyanin and also includes Beta Glucan and other important ingredients like Fulvic acid, Trimethylglycine, AFA, Vitamin C and Vitamin D. We consider NeuStem™ Cell Helper our improved replacement product over Vita-Stim Concentrate™.

Pricing Levels:

  • Retail (one-time order): $60
  • Preferred Customer Autoship: $50
  • Distributor (one-time order): $45
  • Distributor Autoship: $40

Autoship is a recurring monthly shipment.

Description

The New NeuStem™ Cell Helper Product is a 750 mg. 2 per day capsule that is more concentrated in Phycocyanin and also includes Beta Glucan and other important ingredients like Fulvic acid, Trimethylglycine, AFA, Vitamin C and Vitamin D. We consider NeuStem™ Cell Helper our improved replacement product over Vita-Stim Concentrate™.

Pricing Levels:

  • Retail (one-time order): $60
  • Preferred Customer Autoship: $50
  • Distributor (one-time order): $45
  • Distributor Autoship: $40

Autoship is a recurring monthly shipment.

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Neustem Information

NeuStem™ Home

WHY WE ADDED NEUSTEM™ CELL HELPER SUPPORT TO OUR JDI™ MULTI-VITAMIN FORMULATION

NeuStem™ Cell Helper is a unique patent pending NEW approach to increasing adult stem cell circulation, adding more nutritive factors as well as immune system support. The key features of the NeuStem product are based upon its intricate formulation. The foundation of that is reviewed here:

Phycocyamin from Arthropsira platensis- This key ingredient is found in our Vita-Stim Concentrate™ product. However we have been able to increase this important ingredient in the NeuStem advanced product. Phycocyanin) has been shown to demonstrate the capacity, along with added polysaccharide, to influence the differentiation and proliferation of committed hematopoietic progenitor cells from the bone marrow. So having more of this ingredient simply makes more sense.

Beta Glucan, 1,3/3,6 is the next very important ingredient. Studies have reported administration of various beta glucans to elicit stem cell mobilization. Cramer DE, Wagner S, Li B, Liu J, Hansen R, Reca R, Wu W, Surma EZ, Laber DA, Ratajczak MZ, Yan J: Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells by yeast-derived beta-glucan requires activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9.
Stem Cells 2008, 26:1231-1240 The fact that this substance is 100% polysaccharide adds to both its own end result as well as the facilitation of Phycocyanin.

Fulvic acid is another key ingredient. For purposes of this review, the major factor is it contains extremely bio-active substances rich in low molecular weight fulvic compounds (Fulvic Minerals, amino acids, trace minerals, vitamins and Fulvic Acids) that are the end product of decomposition of once living prehistoric plant matter. These substances contain extremely complex molecules (fulvic compounds) made up primarily of highly protective and seemingly immortal plant phytochemicals that are combined and recombined during the humification (decomposition) process –Fulvic Minerals, having been digested by various species and millions of successive generations of microbes, ultimately became one of the most complex natural substances on earth.Vitamin C as covered by one of our patents and in our current patent pending enables the increased differentiation of adult stem cells increasing the possibility of greater end user response.

Whole Aphanizomenon flos aquae (AFA) is well known in the literature for its stem cell nutrition affect. Since it is a “wild harvested” ingredient, supplies of it may vary as well as cost can increase dramatically. While it remains an important component, the other ingredients above supply the needed ingredients for stem cell nutrition in what we believe are both at higher concentrations as well as efficacy. AFA contains roughly 20% poly saccharides whereby Beta Glucan, 1,3/1,6 contains 100% and has stem cell mobilization qualities of its own.

Trimethylglycine has been added to improve digestibility and dispersiblity. Trimethylglycine is commonly called betaine. It is a nutrient known as a methyl donor. Methyl donors carry and donate methyl molecules, an activity important for cellular reproduction and chemical processes in the body.

Phenyethlyamine (PEA) and its PEA complex, can help to increase neuronal progenitor or adult stem cells naturally and create higher feelings of well being.

Vitamin D deficiency in many populations has been documented. In addition, Vitamin D has been also reported to enhance stem cell mobilization.
The literature documents the ability of these noted components to increase adult stem cells naturally from our own bone marrow just the way our body was designed. Just how much of an increase is an individual response as the only studies done to date were done with healthy subjects. Results will vary upon each person’s current age, health condition and quantity ingested.

The more stem cells or “building blocks” we have available, the faster and better our organs can be repaired. Our overall health is strongly influenced by the continued availability of extra stem cells in our bodies. But as we age our natural stem cell count declines. Natural adult stem cells can migrate to damaged tissues and actually become a new heart cell, liver cell, pancreas cell or any type of tissue cell. They rapidly multiply and can become any kind of cell in a short time.

NeuStem™ Cell Helper is not a drug; it does not contain anything toxic or synthetic to our bodies. It is a unique natural food supplement that supports your body’s natural renewal system. As supplied in our JDI™ Multi it adds almost the equivalent of full dose of key active ingredients supplied in our NeuStem™ Cell Helper.

Key Features

There are numerous factors that set NeuStem™ Cell Helper apart from most other products in this category, including our very own Vita-Stim Concentrate™ First, there is more Phycocyanin in the NeuStem product. Similarly, there is more chlorophyll as well as other amino acid nutrients. Including the progenitor or stem cell increases associated with Phycocyanin, other benefits mentioned in the literature are:

  1. Development of the Immune System.
  2. Development and Growth of Red Blood Cells & White Blood Cells.
  3. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Features
  4. Helps To Protect and Detoxify Liver and Kidney.
  5. May aid other diseases by virtue of immune system enhancement.

Second, the NeuStem product contains Beta Glucan, 1,3/3,6. In addition to the increasing adult stem cell reference on the Home page, these features are also important and a mere fraction of references in the literature.

  1. Administration of glucan particles …stimulates…proliferation of macrophages and increases in phagocytic and secretory activities of macrophages. …A cascade of interactions and reactions initiated by macrophage regulatory factors can be envisioned to occur and to eventuate in conversion of the glucan-treated host to an arsenal of defense.
  2. Beta Glucan has been shown to enhance the envelopment and digestion (phagocytosis) of pathogenic microorganisms that cause infectious disease…The Beta-1,3/1,6 glucans additionally enhance the ability of macrophages, one of the most important cells in the immune system, to kill tumor cells. Laboratory studies have revealed the new MG Glucan is significantly effective at activating macrophages, and via the macrophages, the entire immune system cascade.
  3. Glucan enhances the immune response through stimulation of macrophages by increasing their number, size, and function, stimulates secretion of lysozyme and TNF by activated macrophages, increases the phagocytosis of antigens, activates the formation of granulocyte and monocyte colonies, and factors increased activity of T and B lymphocytes, as well as complement activation.”
  4. The February, 2013 issue of the European Journal of Nutrition published the results of a clinical trial conducted in Germany which found a protective effect for beta-glucan derived from brewers’ yeast against the risk of acquiring the common cold, as well as a reduction in cold severity.

All of the other ingredients mentioned on the Home page that are part of the NeuStem formulation only further enhance the aspects noted above. When one puts all of the features reviewed, as well as others too numerous to mention, one can surely see why NeuStem™ Cell Helper is another JDI product breakthrough. References:

  1. An Arsenal of Immune Defense: Czop, Joyce K., “The Role of Beta.-Glucan Receptors on Blood and Tissue Leukocytes in Phagocytosis and Metabolic Activation”. Pathology and Immunopathology Research; 5:286-296. Harvard Medical School. 1986.
  2. Activation of Immune Defense Against Infectious Disease: Hunter K, Gault R, Jordan F, “Mode of Action of B-Glucan Immunopotentiators-Research Summary Release,” Department of Microbiology, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Jan 2001.
  3. Immune Response Enhancement: Meira, D.A., et al; The Use of Glucan as Immunostimulant in the Treatment of Paracoccidioidomycosis; Am J. Trop Med Hyg 55(5), 496-503; 1996. Dept of Trop Dis, Dept of Microbio, State U of Sao Paulo, Brazil
  4. Senesi, N. (1990). Analytica Chimica Acts, 232, 51-75. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.
  5. Vital electrolytes-Baker, W.E. (1973). Geochimilen at Casmochtulon Acts, 37, 269-281.
  6. Gamble, D.S., & Schnitzer, M. (1974). Trace Metals and Metal-Organic Interactions in Natural Waters. Ann Arbor, Mi: Ann Arbor Science.
  7. Power of an electrolyte – Crile, G. (1926). A bipolar theory of living processes. New York: McMillen.
  8. Decrease in electrical potential – Crile, G. (1926). A bipolar theory of living processes. New York: McMillen.
  9. Powerful electrolyte – Jackson, William R. (1993). Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil Conditioning 329. Evergreen, Colorado: Jackson Research Center.
  10. New Electronic Encyclopedia. (1991). Photosynthesis. Grolier Electronic Publishing.
  11. Donor and acceptor – Jackson, William R. (1993). Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil Conditioning. Evergreen, Colorado: Jackson Research Center.
  12. Donor and receptor – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of marine humic substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
  13. Donor, receptor-Sposito, G., Holtaclaw, K.M., LeVesque, C.S., & Johnston, C.T. (1982). Trace metal chemistry in arid-zone filed soils amended with sewage sludge. II. Comparative study of the fulvic and fraction. Soil Science Society America Journal, 45, 265-270.
  14. Mineral complexes in fulvic may serve as electrodes-Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of marine humic substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
  15. Free radical-Senesi N. (1990) Analytion Chimica Acts, 232, 51-75. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elaevier.
  16. Free radical – Senesi, N., Chen, Y., & Schnitzer, M. (1977b). The role of humic acids in extracellular electron transport and chemical determination of pH in natural waters. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 9, 397-403.
  17. Oxidation reduction – Senesi, N., Chen, Y., & Schnitzer, M. (1977b). The role of humic acids in extracellular electron transport and chemical determination of pH in natural waters. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 9, 397-403.
  18. Dissolves metals and minerals – Ong, H.L., Swanson, V.D., & Bisque, R.E. (1970) Natural organic acids as agents of chemical weathering (130-170). U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 700 C. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey.
  19. Enhance and transport nutrients – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakish, A. (1971). Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Seo Paulo, Brazil, London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science).
  20. Enhance and transport nutrients – Prakash, A. (1971). Fertility of the Sea, 2, 351-368.
  21. Williams, S.T. (1963). Are antibiotics produced in soil? Pedobiologia, 23, 426, 435.
  22. Stimulate growth – Kanonova, M.M. (1966). Soil organic matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
  23. All known vitamins in soil – Kanonova, M.M. (1966). Soil organic matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
  24. Many times its weight – Deb, B.C. (1949). The movement and precipitation of iron oxides in podzol soils. Journal of Soil Sciences, 1, 112-122.
  25. Catalyzes enzyme reactions – Khristeva, L.A., Luk’Yaneko, M.V. (1962). Role of physiologically active substances in soil-humic acids, bitumens and vitamins B, C, P-PA and D in the life of plants and their replenishment. Soviet Soil Sciences, 10, 1137-1141.
  26. Fulvic and enzymes – Pardoe, H.L., Townshend, A., Clerc, J.T., VenderLinden (Eds.), 1990, May 1). Analytica Chimica Acts, Special Issue, Humic and Fulvic Compounds, 232 (1), 1-235. (Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier Science Publishers).
  27. Increase assimilation – Buffle, J. (1988). Complexation Reactions in Aquatic Systems: An Analytical Approach. Chickester: Horwood.
  28. low molecular weight, Aiken, G.R, McKnight, D.M., & VacCarthy, P. 1985). Humic substances of soil, sediment and water, New York: Wiley-Interscience.
  29. sensitize cell membranes – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of Marine Humic Substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
  30. Stimulate metabolism – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of Marine Humic Substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
  31. Genetic and growth – Jackson, William R. (1993). Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil Conditioning, 538. Evergreen, Colorado: Jackson Research Center.
  32. Oxygen is absorbed-Kononova, M.M. (1966). Soil organic matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
  33. Rapid transport to shoots-Kanonova, M.M. (1966). Soil organic matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
  34. Immune system-Syltie, P.W. (1985). Effects of very small amounts of highly active biological substances on plant growth. Biological Agriculture and Horticultures, 2, 245-269, and Research reports and studies, Appropriate Technology Ltd. Dallas, TX: Murray Sinks II of ATL (Publisher).
  35. Modify damage by toxic compounds-Christman, R.F., & Gjessing. E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakash, A. (1961). Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Seo Paulo, Brazil, London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science).
  36. Environmental chemicals.
  37. Paraquat – Fischer, A.M., Winterie, J.S., & Mill, T. (1967). Primary photochemical processes in photolysis medicated by humic substances. In R.G. Zika & W.J. Cooper (Eds). Photochemistry of environmental aquatic system (141-156). (ACS Symposium Series 327). Washington DC: American Chemical Society.
  38. Pesticides – Aiken, G.R, McKnight, D.M., & MacCarthy, P. (1985). Humic substances of soil, sediment and water. New York: Wiley-Interscience.
  39. Radioactive properties – Szalay, A. (1958). The significance of humus in the geochemical enrichment of uranium. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, 2, 182-186. (London: Pergamon).
  40. Dissolves and weathers silica-Huang, W.H., & Delier, W.D. (1970). Dissolution of rock-forming silicate minerals in organic acids; simulated first stage weathering of fresh minerals surfaces. America Mineralogical Journal, 55, 2076-2097.
  41. Dissolves silica-Kodmans, H., Schnitzer, M., & Jaakkimainen, M. (1983). Chlorite and biotite weathering by fulvic acid solutions in closed and open systems. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 63, 619-629.
  42. Transmutate or synthesis of new minerals – Schnitzer, M, & Dodama, H. (1977). Reactions of minerals with soil humic substances. In J.B. Dixon & S.B. Weed (Eds.), Minerals in soil environments (Chap. 21). Madison, WI: Soil Science Society of America.
  43. See “The Fulvic Acid, Vegetal Silica Miracle” later in this report, and further documentation of Kervran, Lois C., Biological Transmutations.
  44. Cell elongation – Poapst , P.A., & Schnitzer, M. (1971). Fulvic acid and adventitious root formation. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 3, 215-219.
  45. Enhance permeability of cell membranes – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakash, A. (1971). Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Sao Paulo, Brazil, London and New York: Gordon and Breach Science) low molecular weight, Aiken, G.R., McKnight, D.M., & VacCarthy, P. 1985). Humic substances of soil, sediment and water, New York: Wiley-Interscience.
  46. Sensitizing agent – Prakash, A. (1971). Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Sao Paulo, Brazil, London, and new York: Gordon and Breach Science).
  47. Increase metabolism of proteins – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakash, A. (1971). Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Seam, Sao Paulo, Brazil, London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science).
  48. Proteins, DNA, RNA – Khristeva, L.A., Solocha, K.L., Dynkins, R.L., Kovalenko, V.E., & Gorovaya, A.I. (1967). Influence of physiologically active substances of soil humus and fertilizers on nucleic acid metabolism, plant growth and subsequent quality of the seeds. Humus at Plants, 4, 272-276.
  49. Proteins, DNA, RNA – Jackson, William R. (1993). Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil Conditioning, 569-570. Evergreen, Colorado: Jackson Research Center.
  50. Synthesis of RNA and DNA – Khristeva, L.A. (1968). About the nature of physiologically active substances of the soil humus and of organic fertilizers and their agricultural importance. In F.V. Hernando (Ed.), Pontifica academec scientarium citta del vaticano (701-721). New York: John Wiley.
  51. Catalyst to vitamins within the cell – Williams, Dr. Roger J. (1977). The Wonderful World within You. Bio-Communications Press. Wichita, Kansas.
  52. Transport metal ions – Schnitzer, M., & Khan, S.U. (1972). Humic substances in the environment. New York: Dekker.

Ingredients

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